Bending the Third Rail
Because We Should, We Can, We Do
Friday, February 24, 2006
Lindsey Graham vs. Us

Greyhair's post on the new detention centers brought to my attention yet another demonstration that my senator, Lindsey Graham, does not represent me. The article on alternet, which describes the new detention centers slated for construction here in the U.S., starts with this:

Not that George W. Bush needs much encouragement, but Sen. Lindsey Graham suggested to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales a new target for the administration's domestic operations -- Fifth Columnists, supposedly disloyal Americans who sympathize and collaborate with the enemy.

"The administration has not only the right, but the duty, in my opinion, to pursue Fifth Column movements," Graham, R-S.C., told Gonzales during Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on Feb. 6.

"I stand by this president's ability, inherent to being commander in chief, to find out about Fifth Column movements, and I don't think you need a warrant to do that," Graham added, volunteering to work with the administration to draft guidelines for how best to neutralize this alleged threat.

"Senator," a smiling Gonzales responded, "the president already said we'd be happy to listen to your ideas."

What is the fifth column?
According to, a fifth column refers to any clandestine group or faction of subversive agents who attempt to undermine a nation's solidarity.

The Bush regime has consistently demonstrated that anyone who disagrees with their agenda is not a patriot, not "with us", and subject to arrest. In another article online:

Plans for detention facilities or camps have a long history, going back to fears in the 1970s of a national uprising by black militants. As Alonzo Chardy reported in the Miami Herald on July 5, 1987, an executive order for continuity of government (COG) had been drafted in 1982 by FEMA head Louis Giuffrida. The order called for "suspension of the Constitution" and "declaration of martial law." The martial law portions of the plan were outlined in a memo by Giuffrida's deputy, John Brinkerhoff.
In 1985, President Reagan signed National Security Decision Directive 188, one of a series of directives that authorized continued planning for COG by a private parallel government.
Two books, James Mann's "Rise of the Vulcans" and James Bamford's "A Pretext for War," have revealed that in the 1980s this parallel structure, operating outside normal government channels, included the then-head of G. D. Searle and Co., Donald Rumsfeld, and then-Congressman from Wyoming Dick Cheney.

The article concludes by saying, "It is clear that the Bush administration is thinking seriously about martial law." It is equally clear to me that Senator Graham is right there with him.